Bon appétit!

spring14 Three French bakeries bring delectables to Pittsburgh

Who wouldn’t love to spend April in Paris? However, if France isn’t in your immediate future, you can still enjoy its delectable treats right here in Pittsburgh. These three patisseries are like children; you love them all, but each has its own special talent. more >

North by northwest

spring14 A trip to the wilds & towns of McKean County

Summer has finally arrived, and there is no better time for a weekend (or mid-week) getaway. McKean County is a few hours from Pittsburgh and a great area to explore, play, relax and have fun. Whether your interests are historic, outdoorsy, culinary or sporty, you will find no lack of things to do. more >

Shouf’s Café

spring13 Mediterranean flavor in Bridgeville

Sometimes, when Rabih Fahed pauses during a hectic night at Shouf's Cafe, the room filled with love and laughter, families and friends hugging hello and crowding in close, and exotic aromas teasing the air, he can close his eyes and be back in the Lebanon of his youth. more >

Cafe Raymond

spring14 A special place in The Strip

Some neighborhood joints acquire an aura, off the beaten path or tucked away on some dicey back street, lending “insider” status to those who can get you there for a special lunch or evening out. A little bit like playing hard to get, this geographical inconvenience makes any great joint that much more enticing. more >

Autumn weekend

spring13 Foliage & history on US Route 6
There are all sorts of iconic American highways that appear in song and lore—Route 66, the Pacific Coast Highway and the Blue Ridge Parkway, to name a few. But, according to National Geographic, "one of America's most scenic drives" is right here in Pennsylvania: U.S. Route 6. more >

The Century Inn

spring13 Going strong after 219 years
T he national road, America’s first federally funded road, was built from 1811 to 1834 at the urging of former President George Washington and then-President Thomas Jefferson. It connected Cumberland, Md., and the Ohio River in Wheeling, W.Va., as a gateway to the West. The road was once a stagecoach route where towns had sprung up about every 12 miles, the distance a team of oxen could travel in a day. more >

Choose your brews


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A visit to the House of 1,000 Beers
The name alone is overwhelming. Yet intriguing. Go to 357 Freeport St. in New Kensington, and you will find everything from Allagash (Belgian-style stout from Portland, Maine) to Zywiec (from a Polish brewery founded in 1856 in Austria-Hungary and once owned by the Hapsburgs). more >

A Wheeling wonder

win13 Drive
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Oglebay lights up the holidays & more
There is nothing like a big light display to get you in the mood for the holidays, and the Winter Festival of Lights at Oglebay in Wheeling, W.Va., will put a smile on the grumpiest Scrooge! more >

Fede Artisan Pasta

worththedrive fall12A flavorful find in North Huntingdon
Cooling autumn temperatures call for a change in dinner palate from salads and grilled chicken to heartier fare. Pasta is perfect on a crisp fall evening… and perfect pasta is created daily at Fede Artisan Pasta in Banco Business Park in North Huntingdon, Pa. more >

Take a turn...

placeholder spreadInto the North Side's bicycle heaven
Does the end of gray winter days remind you how it felt to get your bike back out of the garage and cruise the streets with your friends after school? With a visit to Bicycle Heaven, you can rekindle that excitement on a trip down memory lane. more >

Sit, stay, play

worththedrive sum12
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Misty Pines Dog Park Company in Wexford
The “dog days of summer” means exceptionally steamy temperatures for us, but for our canine friends, every day is a “dog day.” Now, however, pet owners can give that phrase new meaning by paying a visit to Misty Pines Dog Park Company in Franklin Park.
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Gilded Age holiday

gildedage win11 Festivities at the Frick
In 1882, Henry Clay Frick purchased an Italianate-style mansion on Penn Avenue in Point Breeze. The “Coke King” named it Clayton, commissioning two major renovations for his growing family. Within 10 years, though, Frick and his wife, Adelaide, suffered the loss of two of their four children, 8-year-old Martha and infant Henry Clay Frick, Jr., in 1891 and 1892, respectively. And in 1905 the Fricks and their two surviving children, Childs and Helen, moved to New York City.   more >



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